Capitol Hill rioter and antifa activist John Sullivan is back in custody as he is accused of violating the conditions of his release. He was allowed to walk away from jail without posting bail as long as he met certain conditions of his release.

One of his conditions was his usage of the internet. Police say he violated that condition four times. The judge had released him over the objections of prosecutors because she said they did not produce enough proof.

That is not uncommon and does not mean they don’t have rock-solid evidence. Prosecutors try to present just enough to get an indictment or to set bail. Sometimes it’s not quite enough.

It’s not wise to tip the defense on how you plan to present your case and give them a chance to form a plan to combat it. He was to step down and do no work for the group he founded but did not have to concede his control.

FOX News reported:

In a court document filed last week, U.S. Pretrial Services Officer Josh Cahoon alleged that Sullivan violated his approved Internet usage on four separate instances, The Salt Lake Tribune reported.

Magistrate Judge Daphne Oberg, of the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah, issued a court summons for Sullivan based on the filing. He faces federal charges of civil disorder, entering a restricted building and violent entry or disorderly conduct.

The judge had ordered Sullivan to be released conditionally without bail on Jan. 15, deciding that prosecutors failed to meet the legal threshold required to keep him jailed. Assistant U.S. Attorney Bryan Reeves had argued Sullivan is a risk for trying to threaten witnesses or jurors, but Oberg said Reeves lacked substantial evidence.

The terms of his release agreement required Sullivan to stay off social media before trial, surrender his passport and be on house arrest. He also was ordered to stop working for the Insurgence USA activist group he founded, although he didn’t have to cede control. His computer and internet activities would be monitored.

The original charges stem from his arrest over his actions at the storming of the Capitol on January sixth, He was originally released after telling police he was only recording the action.

He was after a video he made came to light.

In it, he admitted that he broke windows and did other damage inside the Capitol Building.

That video is no longer available to the public.

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