Health care workers are chiming in after a nurse from San Diego tested positive for COVID-19 over a week after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine made by Pfizer.

On December 18, Matthew W, an ER nurse at two separate hospitals, posted on Facebook about getting the Pfizer vaccine earlier that day.  He had reported that his arm was sore for about a day or so, but he didn’t get any other side effects.

“Got my Covid vaccine! The 15 minutes afterward sitting around with a bunch of others while health care workers asked us how we felt made me think of an opium den. I’ll report back if I start to grow a third arm,” Matthew wrote.

However, on Christmas Eve, about six days later, he had ended a shift in the COVID-19 unit when he suddenly began feeling sick.  He reported he had the chills and later felt fatigue and had muscle aches.

He got through Christmas day, but the day after he drove to a drive up hospital testing site and learned that he had tested positive for coronavirus.

“It’s not unexpected at all. If you work through the numbers, this is exactly what we’d expect to happen if someone was exposed,” said Dr. Christian Ramers, who servers as an infectious disease specialist with Family Health Centers of San Diego.   Dr. Ramers also serves on a clinical advisory panel for the vaccine rollout for the county.

Dr. Ramers noted that the RN could have gotten infected prior to getting the vaccine since the incubation period could be as long as two weeks.  He added that if the nurse got the virus after receiving the vaccine, it can still make sense with everything we now know.

“We know from the vaccine clinical trials that it’s going to take about 10 to 14 days for you to start to develop protection from the vaccine,” Dr. Ramers said.

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Pfizer vaccine regulators have discovered the best immunity against COVID-19 is found about seven days after the second dose, which you get three weeks after the first dose.  This means there’s a distinct possibility that someone who got the vaccine could still get infected with the virus during that time period.

All patients require two doses of the vaccine to achieve their immunity.

The doctor mentioned that he knows of several other local cases in which other health care workers were infected around the time they received their vaccine, and pointed out that the cases he’s familiar with all demonstrate that results aren’t ever immediate.

“That first dose we think gives you somewhere around 50%, and you need that second dose to get up to 95%,” said Dr. Ramers.

Matthew said he felt better since his symptoms appeared last week.

The Trump administration’s goal to vaccinate the majority of the US population in the first half of next year has been harmed by the slow rollout.  According to a new report, at the current rate hitting that number could take close to 10 years to reach.  And since people no longer believe the news, the Democrats, or the deep state, we have no way of knowing if that information is valid or not.

At the current rate, this means more than three million Americans will have to received vaccinations daily in order to meet the government’s June deadline.

Dr. Ramers believes Matthew’s experience dictates that even with the vaccines, this pandemic isn’t going to turn around instantly.

“You hear health practitioners being very optimistic about it being the beginning of the end, but it’s going to be a slow roll, weeks to months as we roll out the vaccine,” Dr. Ramers added.

Matthew said he’s feeling a lot better since Christmas Day when his symptoms had reached a peak, but he also said he still feels tired.  That’s to be expected, but we hope he fully recovers.

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