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Protesters Chain Doors Of Police Station, Locking Officers Inside For 7 Hours

On July 3rd a group of protestors trapped police officers inside their station in Aurora, CO by chaining the doors so police officers couldn’t get out and roped the gates closed so those police officers couldn’t leave through the gates.

“The unfortunate part is they trapped our officers inside, not just them being around the building, but physically wrapping ropes and other items around the doors of the district one station, around the entry-exit gates our patrol cars come out of… that was probably the most dangerous part,” Aurora Police Department Spokesman Officer Matthew Longshore said.

The incident lasted over 7 hours and the media has been silent.

The protest was on the memorial of 23-year-old Elijah McCain who lost his life in police custody in 2019. The incident was investigated and the officers were found innocent of wrongdoing. The protestor’s demands were to terminate the rest of the officers involved in the death of McClain.

The police department said they didn’t act immediately because they wanted to protect the protestors first amendment rights and the police officers were safe inside.

But were they safe?

Since when does the first amendment allow protestors to lock police officers inside and building and hold them hostage? They simply held back to satisfy a pack of hungry wolves. This is domestic terrorism.

After they cleared out the protestors they found full gas cans staged near the station. That doesn’t seem to suggest these were peaceful protestors simply there to practice their first amendment right.

From The Police Tribune

Aurora, CO – Aurora police officers were trapped inside the District 1 station house for hours July 3 night after protesters chained the doors shut and plotted to storm the building.

The incident occurred when protesters demonstrating at a memorial for 23-year-old Elijah McClain marched to the Aurora Police Department’s District 1 station house near Montview and Wheeling just after 8 p.m. on July 3, KDVR reported.

Protesters chained the doors of the police station shut from the outside, trapping officers inside.

Aurora police have refused to comment on how many officers were locked inside the building for approximately seven hours, KDVR reported.

“The unfortunate part is they trapped our officers inside, not just them being around the building, but physically wrapping ropes and other items around the doors of the district one station, around the entry-exit gates our patrol cars come out of… that was probably the most dangerous part,” Aurora Police Department Spokesman Officer Matthew Longshore said.

Angry protesters barricaded the streets and vandalized the exterior of the police station, KDVR reported.

Police didn’t move in to clear out the protesters locking their fellow officers in the station until about 3:30 a.m. on July 4 when rioters began shooting fireworks at officers in the area.

The lock-in had been going on for about seven hours by then, according to KDVR.

“They were starting to take the big mortar style type fireworks while they were trying to untie the gates so officers could come and go, they started throwing fireworks at them. Not only that, someone had a fire extinguisher, they were spraying our officers with a fire extinguisher. We didn’t use any force until they started doing it to us, that’s when we used 40-millimeter foam rounds, no pepper spray or tear gas or smoke,” Officer Longshore explained.

He said that the decision to let the protesters keep the officers locked in was made intentionally, KDVR reported.

“There wasn’t a rush to come in move people out,” Officer Longshore said. “The officers were safe inside. We wanted to give the people the ability to express their First Amendment right, to protest, peacefully assemble and make their voices heard, so we didn’t have an immediate rush to go in and clear people out. Waiting a little bit longer, the crowd size became smaller, so we had an advantage.”

Afterward, police found full gas cans and other homemade weapons hidden in the area around the police station, KDVR reported.

“We found gas cans, full of gasoline that were staged in that immediate area,” Officer Longshore said.

Officers were unable to respond to 911 calls in the area for the seven hours protesters surrounded District 1, KDVR reported.

“Come get your message across. That’s great, but to put officers’ lives at risk or the community’s lives at risk because we can’t respond because we are trapped inside of a building, that’s not right,” Aurora police said.

Protesters served Aurora Police Chief Vanessa Wilson with a list of demands shortly after 8 p.m. that included the termination of the rest of the officers involved in the death of McClain on Aug. 24, 2019.


The incident occurred when police responded to a call about a suspicious person wearing a mask and waving their arms on Billings Street, the Denver Post reported.

When police arrived on the scene, the suspect – later identified as McClain – refused police commands to stop so they could talk to him.

Police tried to detain McClain and he resisted arrest, and so they used a takedown move and pinned the 140-pound man to the ground.

“Let go of me. I am an introvert. Please respect the boundaries that I am speaking,” McClain told the officers in bodycam video, the Associated Press reported.

Officers used a “carotid control hold” on McClain, according to the Denver Post.

The suspect told police he couldn’t breathe and vomited several times, but he also continued to resist arrest.

Officials said one of the officers requested that paramedics who arrived on the scene dispense a sedative to the still-resisting suspect, KMGH reported.

Paramedics gave McClain a 500 milligram dose of ketamine to calm him down.

However, Aurora police said bodycam video proved it wasn’t the officers’ idea to sedate McClain, KMGH reported.

He suffered cardiac arrest in the ambulance on the way to the hospital and never regained consciousness, the Associated Press reported.

McClain died on Aug. 30, 2019, three days after he was taken off life support.

The Aurora Police Department investigated and the district attorney for the 17th Judicial District determined there was no criminal wrongdoing by the officers involved, the Denver Post reported.

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