Kate Brown is now the official sponsor of antifa and BLM. When the state of Oregon received their CARES Act money, they divided among groups they claimed does excellent work in the state. One of those groups, known as Snack Bloc received $145,000 for the good work they have done in rioting in Portland and destroying businesses.

The group “SNACK BLOC” that received CARES ACT money designed to help people in need turns out to be unabashedly antifa and BLM. And just think, every time they burn down a building, you paid for the gasoline and the matches. The group was in the shadow for three years but came out of the closet once they got their  501c3 charitable group status.

They were at the protest at the home of Mayor Ted Wheeler:

They “helped” “comrades” with bail:

From PJ Media

The group “helped” to get rid of cops, like the Marxists they are. The group encouraged people to turn off their cell phones while at protests.

Just so you know, your cell phone is a fu–ing snitch. Don’t let that rat see you at a protest, and definitely don’t post pictures with it. Turn it off or put it on airplane mode.

They threw a “bloc party.” You know like “black bloc,” the clothes worn by members of antifa?
In case you’re skeptical about characterization of the group’s purpose, the local press knows exactly who and what it is.
Willamette Week called it “the protest support and mutual aid group … that’s provided resources for almost 100 days of protests across Portland.”
Along with organizing its own events, Snack Bloc has been at seemingly every protest, march and vigil around the city over the past three months, providing snacks, water and supplies to protesters at the Stripper StrikeBLM Art Therapy and rallies across Portland.

When the awards were made in September, the head of the OHA said they were fully aware of the group’s receiving the money and noted how “vital” they are to “their communities” for the “collective work” to end racism, “especially relating to COVID-19.”

“We look forward to partnering with these remarkable organizations and communities, who do such vital work to serve their communities,” said Patrick Allen, OHA director. “We are deeply aware how these organizations’ linkages and knowledge of their communities and the challenges they face are so important to bringing resources to help. We look forward to the collective work to continue to meaningfully address the systemic racism and structural inequities that have caused so much health disparity, especially relating to COVID-19.”

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