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As new U.S.-bound caravan grows to more than 2,000, Mexicans lash out

As new U.S.-bound caravan grows to more than 2,000, Mexicans lash out

Tensions in Mexico rose as word spread of another migrant caravan headed their way.

As a new caravan that began in Honduras and quickly swelled to an estimated 2,000 people made its way toward Mexico on Tuesday, Mexicans who live along the border towns that will likely be most affected took to the Internet to lash out against another wave of migrants.

“Work? Yes, there might be work for people who actually want to work, not for the lazy bums looking for entitlements,” said one commenter, with the screen name Azucena Santos, in Spanish on a YouTube page belonging to Shialeweb, who was recording the caravan. “Poor Mexicans, what’s in store for you!”

Juan Palomina remarked: “Now look, let’s see if whacko [Mexican President} Lopez Obrador mobilizes the Marines and keeps these idiots from coming to Mexico. Give them enough to eat, at least.”

Some urged the migrants not to be blindly optimistic.

“People of Honduras, all of you who are spinning these grand illusions and getting ready to come on this caravan and in any future others, before you leave your country, please inform yourself about how people who’ve already come on previous caravans are faring in Tijuana,” said Belem Gonzales.

“Mexico is just like your country,” Gonzales added. “There are many problems and needs, and you’re not going to be much better off than you were in Honduras. Please don’t trust these manipulative agitators who are encouraging you to risk everything for nothing.”

Luis Mendez was far more unwelcoming. “We do not want caravans of (emojis of rats). Fight conditions in your own country. You are not welcome here.”

By Tuesday afternoon, a caravan that started with about 500 people grew to about 2,000, according to a representative from the Honduras National Commission of Human Rights, which travels with the caravan.

Word of the caravan’s departure was out at least as far back as last week. The newspaper La Prensa, of Honduras, reported on Jan. 9 that a caravan was scheduled to leave from San Pedro Sula on Tuesday – though the first group left the evening before.

Migrants hoping to reach the U.S. wait in line to board a bus toward Honduras' border with Guatemala, as hundreds of migrants set off by bus or on foot from a main bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, late Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. Yet another caravan of Central American migrants set out Monday from Honduras, seeking to reach the U.S. border following the same route followed by thousands on at least three caravans last year. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

Migrants hoping to reach the U.S. wait in line to board a bus toward Honduras’ border with Guatemala, as hundreds of migrants set off by bus or on foot from a main bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras, late Monday, Jan. 14, 2019. Yet another caravan of Central American migrants set out Monday from Honduras, seeking to reach the U.S. border following the same route followed by thousands on at least three caravans last year. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

The newspaper attributed the information to the immigration advocacy group “Pueblos Sin Fronteras,” or “Communities Without Borders,” as well as to “Dignificacion Humana,” or “Dignifying Humans.” Both groups said that some 4,000 migrants in all would end up being part of the caravan.

The hostile social media comments on Tuesday are the latest reflection of tensions that have simmered since the caravans began last year. The tension is particularly prevalent in Mexican cities like Tijuana, where many of the migrants are being held in overcrowded shelters.

Some say the concerns by people in receiving communities are, even if pointed, understandable. But others say the migrants deserve compassion for trying to flee conditions – often life-threatening – they did not create, and cannot control.

The mix of exasperated migrants in overtaxed shelters and Mexican residents growing increasingly concerned about strains on communities has led to a number of clashes. In November, for instance, about 300 Tijuana residents held an anti-caravan demonstration at the same time Central American migrants were holding a protest. The dueling demonstrations ended in a huge fight, with police stepping in and escorting the migrants to various shelters.

On its website, the immigrant advocacy group “Consejo Noruego para los Refugiados,” which is based in Colombia and has various offices in Latin America, decried the backlash against the caravan on “growing xenophobia in the U.S., as well as in Mexico.”

“The journey north will be extremely dangerous and taxing for thousands of families from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala that will be part of the trips in 2019,” the group said. “Probably the obstacles will increase along the journey, given that there’s fatigue and frustration in the communities that have until now supported the caravans.”

Several migrants told U.S. and Latin American news outlets they were determined to flee the poverty and violence in their homeland – no matter how tough U.S. immigration policy had become. Some said they were deported after having taken part in the first caravan last year, and were trying their luck again.

Hondurans take part in a new caravan of migrants, set to head to the United States, as they leave San Pedro Sula, Honduras January 14, 2019. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera - RC1E08C0C6A0

Hondurans take part in a new caravan of migrants, set to head to the United States, as they leave San Pedro Sula, Honduras January 14, 2019. REUTERS/Jorge Cabrera – RC1E08C0C6A0

Meanwhile, on Tuesday, Honduran authorities arrested and detained Juan Carlos Molina,identified by La Prensa, the Honduran newspaper, as a coordinator of the latest caravan.

Ira Mehlman, spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which supports tighter enforcement, said the departure of another caravan was not surprising, considering indications there are individuals or organizations coordinating them. “Probably there are multiple parties involved, who have an interest in challenging the sovereign right of the United States to determine who can enter the country and under what circumstances,” he said.

“You have opportunists and you have people who, understandably, want to come to the United States,” he said, “It’s a situation that’s getting out of hand, and no one is doing anything about it other than an administration that trying to solve things through executive action.”

Mehlman said the backlash the caravans were getting from Mexicans who live in Tijuana and other areas affected by the large crowds of migrants was a logical reaction to the feeling of being overrun. “It does have an impact on people who live in the affected towns, just as it has impact on people in our country,” he said, adding that at the same time that understanding is extended to people who seek a better life, there needs to be understanding for “the motivations of people who want to set limits and enforce laws.”

Fox News producer Daniel Gallo contributed to this report. 

Source: As new U.S.-bound caravan grows to more than 2,000, Mexicans lash out

Gillette’s ‘We Believe’ ad focusing on ‘toxic masculinity’ gets mixed response, sends upset customers to seek other brands

Gillette’s ‘We Believe’ ad focusing on ‘toxic masculinity’ gets mixed response, sends upset customers to seek other brands

Gillette’s brand manager said the company felt compelled to comment on “what’s happening today” in its new ad.

Gillette launched a new campaign “thebestmancanbe.org”. In their new video called “We Believe” Gillette showed how “toxic masculinity” is. In the video it flashes back to their first tag line, The Best A Man Can Be”. And then does a collage of how men have fallen away from being the best they can be. As you watch the video you will see “white men” offend a woman and then a black man correcting his behavior. Driving the idea that white men are arrogant, male chauvinist, insulting men.

“It’s only been a day since Gillette debuted its “We Believe” campaign aimed at combating “toxic masculinity,” and while the ad has earned plenty of praise – and even more publicity – for the brand, critics of the ad are already upset with Gillette for what some feel is an “insulting” message that assumes misogyny is rampant among their customer base.

Others took issue with the company for using a social movement to sell razors, and suggesting that Gillette, which also markets the Venus line aimed at female customers, is being hypocritical.”

In the video you also see two boys wrestling on the ground during a barbeque and a man stops them and says boys don’t act like that. Ummm??? Yes, they do.

We don’t condone men harassing women, bullying others, or degrading women. We do believe men, as women, should be respectful and treat others as they would want to be treated regardless of race, sex or religion.

“But while Gillette says it’s aiming to challenge men “to do more” to “get closer to our best,” some of the customer base was turned off by the ad.

“As a very successful, loving, and responsible husband (married 32 years) and father of two confident young adults (male and female), I find this ad INCREDIBLY insulting,” one commenter wrote on YouTube, where Gillette’s “We Believe” ad had racked up nearly 3 million views as of Tuesday morning. “Gillette has NO BUSINESS assuming most men are bad and misogynistic. I’m not buying ANOTHER product from these self-important morons. How DARE you, Gillette…”

“How to insult 99% of your market lol,” wrote another.

What can you do if you disagree with this kind of advertising laced with social activism overtone, #metoo? Here is their contact info:

The Gillette Company, Inc.

Address:
800 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02199
Corporate Phone:1-617-421-7000

And don’t buy their products.

UAF Contributor Marie Penetranti

Democrats boycott White House border security meeting

Democrats boycott White House border security meeting

Congressional Democrats on Tuesday rejected President Trump’s invitation to a lunch meeting at the White House to discuss border security, in the latest sign that both sides of the government shutdown standoff remain entrenched in their positions with no compromise in sight.

Congressional Democrats on Tuesday rejected President Trump’s invitation to a lunch meeting at the White House to discuss border security, in the latest sign that both sides of the government shutdown standoff remain entrenched in their positions with no compromise in sight.

A senior administration official told Fox News that the president had invited Democrats to join his lunch with members of Congress in the Roosevelt Room shortly after noon. But moments before the session, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement that nobody took them up on the offer.

“The President has a proposal on the table that includes additional technology at ports of entry, allows minors from Central America to seek asylum in their home country, and physical barriers between ports of entry made of steel instead of concrete,” she said. “Today, the President offered both Democrats and Republicans the chance to meet for lunch at the White House. Unfortunately, no Democrats will attend. The President looks forward to having a working lunch with House Republicans to solve the border crisis and reopen the government.

“It’s time for the Democrats to come to the table and make a deal.”

She said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer “refuse to negotiate.”

Trump, however, did not invite Pelosi, instead reaching out to rank-and-file Democrats including centrist Democrats from districts where Trump is popular. A Pelosi aide reportedly said she gave lawmakers her blessing to attend, telling her leadership team that other congressional Democrats can see what she and others have dealt with during the shutdown.

Pelosi predicted that after meeting with Trump, the lawmakers would want to make a “citizen’s arrest,” according to the aide.

But the lawmakers ultimately decided not to attend. The meeting boycott leaves unclear how and when both sides might negotiate a resolution to the partial shutdown, which was triggered when Trump demanded nearly $6 billion for a border wall and Democrats refused — and is now the longest in U.S. history.

House Democrats have tried to pressure the Senate to take up bills funding parts of the government, to no avail. Meanwhile, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., announced Tuesday that if the government remains shut down, the House will not have its planned recess next week.

“If the government is not open, we will not have a recess,” Hoyer told reporters on Capitol Hill Tuesday. “That does not mean we will be here every day, members will be on 24 hours notice. We’ll have some votes next week…we’ll be here next week to do business.”

The last White House meeting with Democratic leaders did not end well. Pelosi, D-Calif., and Schumer, D-N.Y., sat down last week with Trump, but Schumer said it ended when the president “just got up and walked out.”

“He asked Speaker Pelosi, ‘will you agree to my wall?’ She said no. And he just got up, and said, ‘Well, we’ve got nothing to discuss,” Schumer said last week.

Pelosi, after the meeting, said the president was “petulant,” and Schumer added that Trump slammed his hand on a table in frustration and had a “temper tantrum”—a move Trump, Vice President Pence and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy later denied.

Trump rejected the account, tweeting that “Cryin’ Chuck” Schumer “told his favorite lie when he used his standard sound bite that I ‘slammed the table & walked out of the room. He had a temper tantrum.’ Because I knew he would say that, and after Nancy said no to proper border security, I politely said bye-bye and left, no slamming!”

Trump initially requested $5.7 billion in funding for security and construction of the wall, citing the “humanitarian crisis” and “invasion” at the border as reasons. Democrats have vowed to block any type of spending package that would involve funds to build a wall along the Southern border.

But Trump has continued to press for wall funding, tweeting Tuesday: “A big new Caravan is heading up to our Southern Border from Honduras. Tell Nancy and Chuck that a drone flying around will not stop them. Only a Wall will work. Only a Wall, or Steel Barrier, will keep our Country safe! Stop playing political games and end the Shutdown!”

The president on Tuesday also questioned whether Pelosi should continue getting paid while the standoff drags on — as Pelosi accused the president of holding the paychecks of hundreds of thousands of federal workers “hostage.”

“@realDonaldTrump, stop holding the paychecks of 800,000 Americans hostage. There is no reason for them to suffering right now. Re-open the government! #TrumpShutdown,” Pelosi tweeted in response.

Fox News’ Matt Leach and John Roberts and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Democrats boycott White House border security meeting

‘Our Armageddon’: Los Angeles teachers strike in nation’s 2nd largest school district

‘Our Armageddon’: Los Angeles teachers strike in nation’s 2nd largest school district

Teachers in Los Angeles are striking in the pouring rain, throwing the nation’s second-largest school district into chaos.

Los Angeles teachers are walking the picket lines in front of their schools this morning. This is the first time since 1989 the district teachers have striked.  They are striking for:

” better pay, smaller classes, less standardized testing, charter school regulation and more counselors, librarians, and nurses.”

“For special education teacher Mike Finn, the top issue is class-size. He says the 46 students that he has in one composition class is unmanageable.

“I have watched class sizes go up and up,“ he said. He said when it comes to preparing students for college, “everybody’s talking class size.”

Last week a teacher that striked back in 1989 sent an open letter to all the teachers planning on striking.

“This isn’t just a protest on the streets, passing out flyers,” wrote Mandel, who now teaches Film, Arts and Media at Pacoima Middle School. “You need to think about the ramifications of what you’re about to do. You need to think about the reasons you’re out there on the line. And you should be a little scared.”

Some students are walking to picket lines with teachers.

“A few Marshall High students joined the protest rather than going inside.

“I cannot stress how important this strike is to me,” said Lola Babich, 15, a sophomore, to the crowd. “Teachers are the most important people in my life.”

With 45 kids in a classroom, she said in an interview, “it is so hard to focus.”

The teachers are picketing their schools this morning and then heading downtown for a rally.

While striking may encourage the district to give a little money it won’t be enough to hire enough teachers to create smaller classes. Because then you need the infrastructure to hire more teachers and have more classes. Schools are at compacity. And California has a huge debt that cannot be repaid now. So while I support these ideas, the reality is that California is not in a position to give more. It just doesn’t have it.

UAF Contributor Marie Penetranti

Source: ‘Our Armageddon’: Los Angeles teachers strike in nation’s 2nd largest school district

Graham urges Trump to reopen government — but declare national emergency if border deal remains elusive

Graham urges Trump to reopen government — but declare national emergency if border deal remains elusive

The South Carolina Republican said the president should continue trying to cut a deal with Democrats before declaring an emergency as a last resort.

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) said Sunday that President Trump should agree to reopen the government and continue trying to hammer out a deal with Democrats on funding his long-promised border wall — but that the president should declare a national emergency if no progress is made in three weeks.

In an appearance on “Fox News Sunday,” Graham maintained that Trump is not going to give up on his demand for more than $5 billion in funding for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

But he argued that reopening the government and attempting to find a legislative solution, then declaring a national emergency if those talks don’t bear fruit, is the best way forward.

“I would urge him to open up the government for a short period of time, like three weeks, before he pulls the plug. See if we can get a deal. If we can’t at the end of three weeks, all bets are off. See if he can do it by himself through the emergency powers,” Graham said.

Waiting three weeks would take the negotiations past Trump’s State of the Union address later this month.

Continue reading https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/graham-urges-trump-to-reopen-government-%E2%80%94-but-declare-national-emergency-if-border-deal-remains-elusive/ar-BBSaQYC?li=BBnb7Kz

felicia.sonmez@washpost.com

cat.zakrzewski@washpost.com

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