The U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) hub in Louisville confiscated a shipment from China containing more than 10,000 assault rifle components on May 22, 2020.

The package from Shenzhen, China was heading for a home in Melbourne, Florida. The packing slip said the shipment contained 100 Steel Pin Samples. CBP says is common for smugglers to say they are shipping harmless or legitimate items hoping to avoid being caught.

“The importing of any type of munitions is regulated by the ATF,” said Thomas Mahn, Port Director, Louisville. “This smuggler was knowingly trying to avoid detection, however, our officers remain vigilant, ensuring our community is safe.”

The shipment of parts has an estimated value of $129,600.

The CBP officers said they confiscated all sorts of goods from drugs, money, weapons, prohibited agriculture, and other illegal items.

According to Newsweek, CBP stopped other shipments from China in March.

In March, the CBP announced they had confiscated over 5,000 fake drivers’ licenses that had come from China at the Louisville Worldport. Over a six month period, CBP also seized counterfeit birth certificates and passports.

At the time, Chief CBP Officer Brian Lick said in a statement that keeping fake IDs off the streets “significantly reduces” the chances for underage alcohol consumption.

“But alcohol is not the only risk; procurement of fake ID plays a role in identity theft, immigration and public benefit fraud and terrorist motives,” Lick added.

From July through September 2019, CBP officials confiscated a mass quantity of counterfeit jewelry at the Louisville hub. Had the items been genuine, they would have been worth over $90 million dollars.

After a shipment of fake Cartier bracelets was discovered in July 2019, investigators were led to Chapel Hill, North Carolina paster JianGang “Frank” Lan. At the time of his arrest in August 2019, Lan was found to be in possession of over 3,200 counterfeit Cartier bracelets. The same number of non-counterfeit bracelets would have an estimated value of $24.4 million.

In a news release, North Carolina Secretary of State Elaine Marshall said it was “the largest counterfeit seizure we have seen in terms of estimated retail value.”

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